Yeo Moor Primary School

Yeo Moor Primary School

Our PSHE curriculum follows the Jigsaw scheme of work which brings together emotional literacy, social skills and spiritual development in a comprehensive scheme of learning. Teaching strategies are varied and are mindful of preferred learning styles and the need for differentiation. Jigsaw is designed as a whole school approach, with all year groups working on the same theme (Puzzle) at the same time. This enables each Puzzle to start with an introductory assembly, generating a whole school focus for adults and children alike.  In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed through the ‘Calm Me’ time in each piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises and visualisations - all tried, tested and very enjoyable activities for children and teachers alike. Observing your thoughts and feelings, on purpose, in the present moment with no judgement.

Knowledge Choice:

Autumn 1 – Being Me in My World

Autumn 2 – Celebrating Difference

Spring 1 – Dreams and Goals

Spring 2 –  Healthy Me

Summer 1 – Relationships

Summer 2 – Changing Me

>>SRE: A guide for Parents<<

All classes will work on the same themes, but taught from an age appropriate level. Just as with SEAL lessons, Jigsaw is based around circle time and developing emotional and social awareness as well as teaching children about focus and concentration for learning.

The Jigsaw Charter:

  • We take turns to speak

During the Jigsaw Circle, the Jigsaw Friend for that year group is used as the ‘talking object,’ replicating the Native American ‘talking stick.’ The Jigsaw Friend must be held when the person, adult or child, wants to speak, and needs to be treated as a special asset and member of the class, preferably only used in Jigsaw and related lessons.

  • We use kind and positive words

 It is vital that the teacher models the use of positive language and praises children for doing so. Circle work should be a positive and enjoyable experience. Only when this is established can the Jigsaw Circle be used to tackle more difficult and sensitive issues.

  • We listen to each other

The Jigsaw Circle and ‘Connect us’ aspects of Jigsaw teach children the social skills necessary for active listening, for example, eye contact, open body language, and turn taking. These need to be encouraged and praised in circle work.

  • We have the right to pass

The Jigsaw Circle necessitates children feeling secure and choosing if and when to speak. They must never feel pressured to do so and thus must know they have the right to pass, that is, not to speak if they don’t want to. This approach can raise very personal issues for children and it must always be their choice as to whether they share these in the circle or not.

  • We only use names when giving compliments or when being positive.

If the Jigsaw Circle is being used to tackle a sensitive issue, like trouble in the playground, no names must be used to describe negative behaviours. It is not appropriate for a child to say, “Jamie pushed me in the playground”; instead, children are encouraged to say, “At playtime, someone pushed me and this really hurt my feelings”. Then the whole circle can suggest positive solutions to the problem described.

  • We respect each other’s privacy (confidentiality) 

Although, realistically, it is unlikely that complete confidentiality will be observed, it is important that children are taught to respect the privacy of others and to do their best to keep what is said in Jigsaw Pieces (lessons) and Circles confidential. The teacher must emphasise that she cannot promise complete confidentiality as she must report any information relating to safeguarding concerns.

Inspiration: